The Myth of Teamwork – Jim Wendler

The Myth of Teamwork


The Myth of Teamwork

 About 18 years ago I learned what Teamwork was all about. It wasn't learned on a ridiculous confidence course designed to gain trust from other members of my football team or explained to me at a half-day Feel Good Business Seminar where everyone wears nametags and has coffee breath. I learned it in a hallway. From some upperclassmen with the last name of Cheatham. I don't know his first name but I do know he was an asshole of the finest pedigree. Cheatham hated all of us. Cheatham called us cheerleaders; we were all talk and no action. Cheatham told us to take the fall of weak classmates or take care of the problem ourselves. Cheatham punished us for not sticking up for the weaker classmates. I hear the term Teamwork thrown about in the work place; this became popular in the late 80's (at least that is what I remember). People championed this new attitude and strove to make it part of their businesses. Unfortunately, it's hard to change an adult culture. Teamwork is not something that can be taught without consequences. We'd like to think we are all about Teamwork until the shit hits the fan; then it's every man/woman for themselves. This is the same thing that people do in marriages, relationships and in some cases, as parents. It's easy when it's easy but no one wants to stick around when it's hard. Teamwork is spreading the credit when it goes well and not selling your co-workers out when it doesn't. 90% of the time people point fingers and go to the boss and complain/bitch about co-workers. Unfortunately, these kinds of people are rewarded. TEAMS are built strong by three things: 1. Strong leaders. 2. People who are willing to fulfill their roles. 3. Team is willing to take care of problems internally. Teams work together to bring everyone into the group. Teams work together to make sure there is success. Teams don't tattle on others like a 10 year old. Teams work to make weak people better. Teams have a strong leader; the leader delegates and doesn't reward suck ups. Many years ago I was lucky to be part of one team; it wasn't in the work place or on the playing field. But I won't ever forget what I learned. Being part of a true team requires more responsibility, humility and work than most people are willing to give. Team Wendler has begun and we have already have laid down Our Rules to being successful and how this family will work together. We are only four in number but we will stand like a thousand. • Get the 2nd Edition 5/3/1 Ebook Here5/3/1 2nd Edition Hard Copy on Amazon